3 Signs Your Air Conditioner May Be on it’s Way Out

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3 Signs Your Air Conditioner May Be on it's Way Out

On a hot summer day, an air conditioner can be a true lifesaver, as long as it’s working properly. The main way to ensure that your system will keep you cool all summer long, and save money in the long run, is to schedule a professional tune-up at the start of the season. In addition, however, you can avoid an unpleasant surprise by taking a moment to understand the warning signs that your air conditioner may be failing and the steps you can take to prevent a breakdown before it happens.

Here are five signs of a potential problem with your air conditioner:

1. Increased energy bills

An air conditioner that works harder to achieve the proper temperature uses more energy. If your energy bills are increasing and your home takes longer to cool, this could indicate that your system is failing.

2. The air coming from the vents isn’t cold

The air blowing through the vents should be consistently cool. If you notice that it is no longer as cold as when your system was new, or, of course, if it’s not cold at all, have your system checked out by a professional. The problem could be a simple fix, or something more serious.

3. Weak airflow from your vents

Limited airflow could indicate an issue with the compressor. It may also mean that your air ducts are dirty. Dust and debris can build up in the ducts and prevent air from flowing properly. Leaks in the ducts also prevent the conditioned air from reaching your home’s living spaces. (Ask us about Aeroseal, a patented process that thoroughly and economically seals holes and cracks in air ducts.)

4. Strange noises coming from the AC unit

Air conditioners are designed to run quietly. Squealing, grinding or grating sounds are a clear indication of a malfunction. Have a technician check out any unusual noises as soon as possible. Correcting the problem early can prevent a costly breakdown later on.

5. Leakage around the air conditioning unit

Any leaks should be addressed immediately. Water pooling around the unit may be caused by a clogged or broken drain tube. The presence of water or moisture can lead to mold growth. Water dripping inside the unit may come from ice melting. If the drip pan is full, or you hear chunks of ice falling, call your HVAC technician right away. Either of these can cause significant damage to your air conditioner. A refrigerant leak also requires immediate attention. Refrigerant leaks pose serious health risks and can also indicate a major problem with your system.

Any of these signs warrant a service call. For increased peace of mind, however, be sure to schedule an annual tune-up by a licensed HVAC technician. Doing so will greatly diminish the likelihood of emergency repairs and will also extend the life of your air conditioner and save money on energy costs.

Contact Rheem Pro Partner today for all your air conditioning needs. We proudly serve homes throughout Colorado and Wyoming.

5 Reasons to Invest in Regular HVAC Maintenance

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5 Reasons to Invest in Regular HVAC Maintenance

When your HVAC system is running smoothly, scheduling maintenance appointments may be way down at the bottom of your to-do list. However, annual HVAC maintenance is the easiest and most economical way to ensure that your air conditioner and furnace work properly and safely all season long. Taking care of your equipment improves energy efficiency and prevents the inconvenience of breakdowns and costly emergency repairs. It also keeps your system from needing a replacement prematurely. Preventive maintenance is the best way to protect this significant investment in your home.

Here are the top five reasons you should invest in regular HVAC preventive maintenance:

1. Increases energy efficiency

An HVAC system that has to work harder to maintain the proper temperature uses more energy. Regular maintenance keeps your system running as efficiently as possible and that can translate into substantial energy cost savings over time.

2. Minimizes air conditioner and furnace repairs

A trained HVAC technician can catch small problems while they are easy and inexpensive to fix, and even prevent problems from arising in the first place. Maintenance appointments at the start of the season can be easily scheduled at your convenience. Regular maintenance prevents the need for emergency repairs, which are costly and inconvenient. During peak periods in winter and summer, any service call can be challenging to schedule as demand increases dramatically.

3. Lengthens the lifespan of your air conditioner and furnace

Normal wear-and-tear occurs over time as your furnace and air conditioner are used normally and can get worse as the equipment ages without proper care. Regular maintenance decreases that wear-and-tear, effectively prolonging the life of your system. This means more years of service before you need a replacement.

4. Improves indoor air quality

Indoor air pollution has become an increasing problem as our homes are sealed more tightly against the elements, trapping harmful or irritating substances such as dust, cigarette smoke and pet dander, inside. This is particularly troubling for people with allergies or respiratory illnesses. Regular HVAC maintenance keeps your system clean and ensures that the air circulating throughout your home is clean and well-filtered.

5. Ensures the safety of your home

A poorly maintained HVAC system can result in a carbon monoxide leak.  Preventive maintenance typically includes a carbon monoxide test which can detect a potential hazard before it becomes deadly.

Contact Rheem Pro Partner to schedule your summer maintenance today! Rheem Pro Partner serves homes throughout Colorado and Wyoming.

Air Conditioner Turns On and Off Frequently? Here are Some Things You Can Do

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Air Conditioner Turns On and Off Frequently? Here are Some Things You Can Do

If you notice your air conditioner turning on and off every few minutes, you should address it right away. This is known as short cycling. It wears out the compressor, one of the main components of the outside unit that is very expensive to repair or replace.

Short cycling can lead to other problems as well.

  • The repeated system start-ups use more energy and unnecessarily Increase energy costs.
  • The excessive wear-and-tear shortens the life-span of your air conditioner.
  • Over-worked equipment results in costly repairs.
  • High humidity or temperature swings mean decreased comfort.

What can cause an air conditioner to short cycle?

Dirty air filter

One common cause is a dirty air filter, which can inhibit airflow and cause a host of problems. Change the air filter every 30 to 60 days to keep your air conditioner equipment clean and running smoothly.

Dirty condenser coils

When the condenser unit and coils get dirty, they don’t work efficiently, making the whole system work harder and possibly overheat. This triggers the unit to shut off and restart repeatedly. Make sure the area around the unit is clear of debris such as leaves.

Improperly located thermostat

Locating a thermostat improperly can cause the thermostat to misread the actual temperature and turn on and off more than necessary. Make sure your thermostat is installed on an interior wall away from windows, doors to the outside, air vents and direct sunlight.

Frozen evaporator coil

Restricted airflow and low pressure throughout the system can result in ice or frost forming on the evaporator coil.

Oversized air conditioner

If short cycling has always been an issue, it is likely that your air conditioner is too big for your home. An oversized air conditioner will cool your home quickly but without properly dehumidifying the air. In addition to short cycling, this can lead to hot and cold spots, and the lack of efficiency will mean higher energy bills.

Low refrigerant / freon

Low levels of refrigerant may indicate that there is a leak. Any leak should be identified and repaired right away by your HVAC professional.

Because short cycling can be an indication of a serious problem, the sooner you address it the better in order to prevent or mitigate any potential damage.

Rheem Pro Partner is ready to help with all your air conditioning needs. Contact us today in Colorado and Wyoming with your concerns about short cycling, or any questions regarding your heating and cooling equipment.

How to Save Big with Rheem and Excel Energy Rebates

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How to Save Big with Rheem and Excel Energy Rebates

Modern furnaces and air conditioners can deliver enormous energy and money savings, and energy-efficiency rebates can cut their costs even further.

Thanks to the 2018 rebate programs available from Rheem and Xcel Energy, high-quality HVAC equipment has never been more affordable for Colorado homeowners.

The A-B-Cs of Energy-Efficiency Rebates

Xcel Energy is one of the largest electricity and natural gas utility companies in the country. In its efforts to embrace sustainability and environmental responsibility, Xcel Energy is offering substantial rebates to customers in Colorado who purchase and install energy-efficient air conditioners and/or gas furnaces in their homes.

Meanwhile, the HVAC company Rheem, a respected retailer that sells a wide range of energy-efficient appliances, including air conditioners and gas furnaces, is also offering rebates to encourage their customers to purchase superior-quality HVAC equipment that will save them money and reduce their energy consumption.

So what does all this mean to you, the Colorado homeowner? It means you could enjoy up to $2,725 in savings, if you purchase and install a Rheem high-efficiency gas furnace and central air conditioning system in 2018.

These are significant savings, and it doesn’t even factor in the money you’ll save on your utility bills if you take the energy-efficient plunge.

SEER, AFUE and You

To qualify for maximum Rheem and Xcel Energy rebates, you must purchase an air conditioner with a SEER rating of at least 17, and a gas furnace with an AFUE rating of 95 or better.

SEER stands for seasonal energy efficiency ratio, and it measures the relationship between cooling output and energy input. Any air conditioner with a SEER rating of at least 14 would be considered high-efficiency, and a unit with a 17 rating might offer double the efficiency of an older-model air conditioner purchased in the late 1990s.

AFUE stands for annual fuel utilization, and it is stated as the percentage of fuel used by a gas-burning appliance that is actually converted to heat. In comparison to a furnace with an AFUE rating of 80 (the lowest standard currently available), a gas furnace with an AFUE rating of 95 percent would cut energy waste (and energy costs) by at least 15 percent on an annual basis.

If they’re installed as replacements for outdated and outmoded equipment, a SEER 17 air conditioner and an AFUE 95 gas furnace could save you several hundred dollars on your utility bills over the course of a single year. Normally, the high cost of this superior equipment might offset a decent portion of these savings, but rebates are designed to compensate for this difference and make energy-efficient HVAC equipment more practical and affordable for everyone.

Getting Your Rebates

To qualify for Xcel Energy rebates, you must be an Xcel Energy customer living in the state of Colorado, in regions specifically served by this company (Xcel Energy does not serve Wyoming). You must also purchase equipment and installation services from a contractor officially registered by Xcel, and you must meet any and all deadlines associated with the rebate program.

Rheem rebates come directly from the manufacturer, and you must purchase their equipment from a licensed Rheem dealer to receive this financial assistance. Residents of both Colorado and Wyoming are eligible for Rheem rebates, as are residents of every other state.

Saving Money on Energy with Rheem Pro Partners

Rheem Pro Partners in Colorado and Wyoming is a rebate-friendly company, and if you do business with us we’ll handle all the paperwork to make sure you get the benefits you deserve. Our special Xcel Energy and Rheem rebate offer expires on May 31st, 2018, so if you’re in the market for a new furnace and/or air conditioner please contact us today, to learn more about our products and to find out how you can qualify for these exciting rebate programs.

Allergies? An Air Conditioner Tune-up Can Help.

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Allergies? An Air Conditioner Tune-up Can Help.

More than 50 million Americans suffer from allergies, which can affect respiratory function and cause rashes, hives, or excessively dry and itchy eyes or skin. In some instances allergy outbreaks may require medical attention, and even in the best of situations they can cause a great deal of discomfort.

Indoor air pollution is a common trigger of allergy symptoms, which is not surprising since most homes contains a higher density of airborne pollutants than the average city street.

If you or your family suffer from allergies, something as simple as an annual air conditioner tune-up can dramatically reduce your susceptibility to outbreaks. And you can help reduce the risk even further by practicing a little preventive maintenance yourself.

The Shocking Truth about Airborne Allergens in Your Home

Inside the walls of your home, a veritable stew of nasty airborne pollutants may be circulating from one living area to the next at this very moment, wrecking their invisible vengeance on your beleaguered immune system.

Some common indoor pollutants include:

  • Pollen
  • Mold and mold spores
  • Pet dander
  • Synthetic carpet fibers
  • Insect droppings
  • Dust mites
  • Chemical traces from building materials
  • Volatile organic compounds from cleaning and personal care products

These allergens can accumulate inside ductwork, and when furnaces and air conditioners are turned on they can be distributed far and wide to all the rooms you inhabit.

If furnaces and air conditioners get dirty and wet they may contribute directly to this mixture of toxic contaminants, and that is one good reason why air conditioners must be tuned-up and maintained on a regular basis.

The A-B-Cs of Air Conditioner Maintenance

Before the cooling season arrives, the following steps should be taken to ensure your air conditioner is clean and in good working order and will not make your allergy problems worse:

  • Change your air filter. HVAC air filters should always be changed before you use your air conditioner for the first time. For maximum allergy protection and filtering effectiveness, choose a good-quality filter with a MERV rating of between 11 and 17 (anything higher will put too much strain on your AC and cause your utility bills to rise).
  • Clean the vents. Dust, dirt, and grime collect in abundance on the outside and inside of intake and outflow vents, and they should be thoroughly cleaned every two weeks to prevent these contaminants from recirculating when your AC is switched on.
  • Clean the areas of the air conditioner you can access. Each spring, you should clean your air conditioner’s condenser unit (the part of the AC that sits outside) as thoroughly as you can, to prevent the dust and dirt from getting sucked into the system when the air conditioner is turned on. You should also wipe away moisture anywhere you can find it, since moisture anywhere in the system can promote mold growth.
  • Contact your HVAC contractor to arrange a maintenance visit and inspection. This is the most important step in your AC maintenance plan. A trained HVAC technician will examine your entire HVAC system, including the inside and outside of the condenser, to check for dirt and moisture accumulation and any signs of damage. The technician will also inspect your ductwork from one end to the other, and then let you know if it needs to be cleaned or repaired.

Air Conditioner Tune-ups and More from Rheem Pro Partners

In Colorado and Wyoming, Rheem Pro Partners has an unrivaled reputation for quality performance and superior customer service. Contact us today to schedule an appointment for an air conditioner tune-up and maintenance inspection, and within days we will dispatch a technician to your home to check your HVAC system from top to bottom. Cooling season will be here soon, so don’t delay another moment.

What to Do Before Turning on Your Air Conditioner for the First Time this Summer

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What to Do Before Turning on Your Air Conditioner for the First Time this Summer

When summer comes, your air conditioner is a vital asset in your fight to stay cool, calm and collected.

But you should never take the health of your air conditioner for granted. Before the hot weather season officially arrives, here are a few steps you should take to guarantee your air conditioner will be ready to run at full efficiency when you need it …

Outside the Home: Preparing the Condenser

  • If you used a cover on your outdoor condenser unit to protect it from the snow over the winter, remove it before you start the air conditioner.
  • If no cover was used, clean off any and all debris that may have fallen onto the condenser. Next, remove the grill over the fan to check for any debris that may have fallen inside the unit.
  • With a soft brush attachment, vacuum the blades of the fan before reinstalling the grill, and vacuum out the bottom of the condenser box as well. If the blades are covered with grease or grime, you can use a soapy solution and a rag to wipe them off.
  • Remove the side and top panels on the condenser to access the condenser coils. Clean them thoroughly with a soft brush, or wash them off with a hose, or wipe them clean with a special condenser cleaning fluid that can be obtained from any HVAC dealer or home improvement store.
  • Make sure the area around the condenser is clear of all objects or vining plants, within a distance of at least three feet on all sides. When the AC is in operation air should flow freely all around the perimeter of the condenser.
  • If there is a power switch on the condenser, turn it to the ‘on’ position (you should also check the circuit breaker to make sure the power is on there).

Inside the Home: The Filter, Vents and Thermostat

  • Switch the thermostat manually from ‘heat’ to ‘cool.’ If you have a smart thermostat, reprogram it to reflect the coming changes of season. Check the battery on the thermostat to makes sure it is still working, or simply change it if you have not done so within the previous 6-9 months.
  • Clean the dust off the vents in each room throughout the house. If you can see dust has collected inside the vents in the ductwork, vacuum it out with a soft brush attachment.
  • Replace the HVAC air filter. Even if the filter doesn’t look overly dirty, it is always a good idea to get a new filter at the beginning of each heating or cooling season. In general filters should be changed every three months, so that schedule can be coordinated to make sure you install a new one at these important times. While you don’t have to buy the most expensive filters on the market, DO NOT use cheap fiberglass filters. They will rapidly become dirty and will not work particularly well even when they’re new.

Bonus Tip: Schedule a tune-up and maintenance inspection with your HVAC contractor

Home maintenance is important, but there are certain matters you should leave to the professionals.

A trained HVAC professional can inspect your coolant lines for leaks, replenish your supply of coolant if it is low, check your electrical connections and inspect your ductwork to see if it needs to be cleaned or repaired. After these tests are completed, they will turn the system on to make sure everything is top working order.

Seeking the Best HVAC Maintenance Services? Call Rheem Pro Partners Today

At Rheem Pro Partners, our technicians are constantly on-the-go throughout the spring and early summer months, offering expert AC tune-up and maintenance inspection services to our grateful customers in Colorado and Wyoming. To beat the summer rush, please contact us today to schedule your inspection—the health of your air conditioner could depend on it.

3 Home Ventilation Tips for Better Indoor Air

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3 Home Ventilation Tips for Better Indoor Air

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the concentration of air pollutants inside the typical American home is two-to-five times greater than what the average American is exposed to outside, and in many homes pollution density is much higher.

The good news is that this problem is solvable, through an expanded use of ventilation.

What is Ventilation and Why is it Important?

Ventilation means air movement, specifically the removal of stale, polluted indoor air and its replacement with cleaner, fresher air from outside.

Indoor living spaces contaminated with dust, dirt, moisture, pet dander, pollen, mold spores, bacteria, smoke, fumes from nearby roads or adjacent garages, chemical traces from cleaning products, bathroom and kitchen odors, and other sources of airborne unpleasantness require frequent ventilation. But if your home is like most, chances are your ventilation is inadequate.

Our homes are a refuge. Nevertheless, maintaining acceptable air quality inside of them is a constant challenge. Without proper ventilation unclean air can fill your lungs and nasal passages, putting you and your family at risk for allergy attacks, asthma, skin problems, bacterial infections, and eye, nose and throat irritations.

Ventilation is preventive medicine, and if you neglect to provide proper ventilation in your living area you can pay a heavy price for your neglect.

Three Types of Home Ventilation and How They Can Work for You

There are three sources of ventilation that can clear your home’s air: natural ventilation, mechanical ventilation, and air infiltration or exfiltration. The first two can be powerful allies, while the latter can help you as well if you give it a little boost.

Natural Ventilation

Windows and doors (especially screen doors) are your natural ventilators, and if they are kept open and unblocked they can do good work. To increase natural venting efficiency, you should keep windows and doors open on opposite sides of the home and on separate floors. This will draw air through and maximize air flow.

To boost flow further, electric fans can be strategically placed near windows to increase the speed of the air’s movement.

Mechanical Ventilation

If you can’t keep your windows open all year long, you can supplement natural ventilation with one of four mechanical ventilation system options:

  • Supply ventilation systems. Supply fans bring fresh air from the outside through intake vents placed at various locations around the home’s perimeter, piping it throughout the home via ductwork. Supply ventilation systems aren’t suitable for cold climates, since they can pressurize indoor air and increase indoor heat loss through air leakage in winter.
  • Exhaust ventilation systems. These systems use exhaust fans to expel air through outtake vents, depressurizing indoor spaces and making it easier for fresh air to re-enter the home. Exhaust ventilation systems are not ideal for hot, humid climates, where penetration of outside air can create moisture problems on the interior of the home.
  • Balanced ventilation systems. Exhaust and supply fans are both installed and operated in unison, to keep air constantly flowing in and out. Because of their four-season efficiency, balanced ventilation systems work well in any climate.
  • Spot ventilation. Exhaust fans placed in bathrooms, kitchens or garages can ventilate specific rooms vulnerable to odors or other types of contamination.

Mechanical ventilation systems must be properly sized to meet the ventilation needs of each individual home, and trained indoor air quality professionals can help assist with that task.

Infiltration and Exfiltration

Infiltration and exfiltration refer to air leakage into and out of your home through cracks, holes, and crevices in walls, floors and ceilings, or under and around doors and windows. This air movement helps but is not sufficient to fully cleanse indoor air, and you should supplement its action by purchasing air cleaners or air purifiers.

Air cleaners use fans to pull in air, which is then passed through a filter to remove microscopic (or larger) particle contaminants before the air is recirculated into the room.

Air purifiers work similarly, and some models use filters. But other models use ultraviolet light (UV) to neutralize living bacteria and other microorganisms, and still other models use an absorbent material (often activated carbon) to “soak up” the pollen, spores, dust particles, chemical traces and so on that can make your home’s air virtually unbreathable.

Air cleaners and purifiers come in a broad range of sizes, capacities and prices, depending on your needs and preferences.

At Rheem Pro Partners we specialize in the restoration and preservation of indoor air quality. We can offer advice about ventilation and solutions for your air quality needs, and if you are in Colorado or Wyoming we invite you to contact us today to schedule a consultation with a Rheem air quality expert.

3 Reasons Why You Should Avoid Purchasing HVAC Equipment Online

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3 Reasons Why You Should Avoid Purchasing HVAC Equipment Online

You can get everything online these days, including a full range of HVAC equipment. But just because you can do something doesn’t mean you should, and that is certainly true if you need a new furnace or air conditioner.

You may think you’re getting a discount, but in the end all you’ll get out of the deal are headaches and heartache. And in truth you won’t even get the discount: with utility and manufacturer rebates included, the total costs of purchasing from a local dealer will be equivalent to buying online, and without the extra risk.

Purchasing HVAC equipment online is a bad idea, and if you’ve been thinking about it you really need to think again.

Here are three reasons why this option is a recipe for disaster …

1. Manufacturers’ warranties won’t cover online purchases

HVAC manufacturers have the right to void their warranties if their appliances are purchased from questionable sources, and that’s exactly what they’ll do to you if you buy your furnace or air conditioner from an online dealer.

Major HVAC manufacturers are happy to offer guarantees on their equipment, on the assumption that it will be professionally installed. But when furnaces and air conditioners are purchased online, quality assurance in installation services is lacking, since the best installers generally won’t get touch equipment that has been shipped in by truck, sight unseen, from some distant warehouse.

2. If you buy a new furnace or air conditioner online, your purchase can’t be customized for size

Professional HVAC installers rely on Manual J protocols to calculate the exact heating and cooling loads HVAC equipment must meet in order to properly function in a particular home. These calculations should be performed onsite before you purchase a furnace, air conditioner, or heat pump, and if you order your equipment from an online dealer you’ll just be guessing about the size and are likely to make a mistake.

But can’t I buy equipment that’s the same size as my old equipment, you ask? No, because your heat and cooling load may have changed significantly since your last furnace or air conditioner was installed. Any remodeling or other structural changes to your home, or alterations in your living patterns, or even changes in the landscaping outside can impact your heating and cooling requirements, and possibly by a substantial degree.

3. Quality contractors avoid HVAC equipment purchased online like the plague

Good contractors have their reputations to worry about, and they won’t be anxious to install HVAC equipment that doesn’t carry a warranty or has not been carefully chosen based on Manual J estimates (which they’ve had the chance to perform). And they won’t be willing to come to your home for repair and maintenance work, either, should your HVAC system start to break down at some point in the future.

If you purchase a furnace or air conditioner online, your only options for installation will be discount, fly-by-night operators who don’t stand behind their work and are only in it to make a fast buck. Is that really what you want?

That last is a rhetorical question, of course it isn’t.

Want Guaranteed Excellence? Choose Rheem Pro Partners

In Colorado and Wyoming, you can’t go wrong if you purchase your HVAC equipment package from Rheem Pro Partners. We’re licensed, insured, experienced, employ highly trained experts, and offer superior and highly affordable installation and maintenance services to support your purchase of a high-quality furnaceair conditioner, or heat pump. Get your equipment from us and we can guarantee you strong, reliable, consistent performance from day one. Please contact us today to speak with one of our representatives, and to find out more about our excellent products and services.

Contact a Rheem Pro Partner Today!

How Efficient is My Furnace? Here’s How to Tell…

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How Efficient is My Furnace? Here's How to Tell...

In the average American home, heating and cooling costs can account for up to 50 percent of a family’s utility budget. In places like Colorado, where winter weather is more extreme than summer weather, a furnace may be responsible for most of these charges.

In heating and cooling energy efficiency is what matters, and if your current furnace isn’t efficient you may want to make a change.

AFUE: The Gold Standard of Furnace Efficiency

AFUE is an acronym that stands for annual fuel utilization efficiency, and it is the primary measuring standard used to determine the energy efficiency of a natural gas furnace. AFUE is expressed as a percentage; specifically, it is the percentage of useful heat produced (in British Thermal Units, or BTUs) for each BTU of natural gas consumed during the normal operation of a furnace.

A modern, superior-quality, high-efficiency gas furnace may have an AFUE rating of 95-98.5, which means that only a small percentage (1.5-5 percent) of the natural gas it consumes is wasted during the combustion process. The rest is converted directly into useful heat that can be distributed throughout your home. From a cost-benefit standpoint, a furnace with an AFUE rating of 98 would only produce two cents of waste for every dollar you spent on heating bills.

Many people choose to buy gas furnaces with AFUE ratings in the 78-81 range. These units are widely available and cost less than true high-efficiency models.

But folks who choose the cheaper option often fail to consider the savings that higher efficiency furnaces can bring. A furnace with an AFUE rating of 98 could save them up to 20 percent on their heating bills each and every month during the heating season, which can last for as long as six months in northern or mountainous regions.

Needless to say, over time savings like this can really add up, enough to make the high-efficiency furnace a much better investment in the long run.

If your existing furnace was purchased any time within the last 15 years, it should have a yellow label attached that will reveal its AFUE rating plus specific data about how much energy it might be saving you in comparison to less efficient models. If your furnace is older and has no such label, you can safely assume it is operating at far less than 80 percent efficiency and is needlessly costing you money.

The Importance of Furnace Maintenance

Unfortunately, AFUE ratings are only theoretical if regular furnace maintenance is not made a priority. Research shows that operating efficiency can drop by up to five percent for every year that basic furnace maintenance is neglected, so this is not a minor consideration.

Before every heating season, you should contact your HVAC contractor to schedule an appointment for a tune-up and maintenance. During these annual visits, a trained HVAC technician will clean, test and inspect your furnace and ductwork from top to bottom and everywhere in between, and if any additional repairs are needed they can be arranged at that time. Clean ductwork is essential for good air flow, and you shouldn’t forget about having your ducts checked from time to time.

Proper furnace maintenance is your responsibility as well, and you can contribute to the health of your appliance by changing your HVAC filters at the beginning of every heating season. Clogged filters will force furnaces to work harder, and that can cause your heating bills to climb rapidly. To guarantee reliable performance you should avoid cheap fiberglass filters, which get dirty quickly and don’t work efficiently even when they’re brand new.

Rheem Pro Partners is Pro-Energy-Efficiency

Furnace maintenance is a Rheem Pro Partners specialty, so we invite you to contact us today to arrange your annual tune-up and inspection. In Colorado and Wyoming we are the premier dealer of high-quality, high-efficiency gas furnaces from Rheem, the preeminent name in the HVAC industry, and if decide you’d like to purchase a new energy-efficient furnace we can help you select the best option for your home and budget.

Find a Rheem Pro Partner Today!

3 Things to Consider Before Buying a Heat Pump

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3 Things to Consider Before Buying a Heat Pump

To cut down on the high cost of heating your home, you have two options. You can either lower the temperature in your home or increase the efficiency of your heating system. Nobody wants to freeze so increasing efficiency is definitely the better option. One way you can improve your energy efficiency is by installing a heat pump. Heat pumps are heating and cooling systems that many people overlook.

How a Heat Pump Works

Rather than having separate heating and air conditioning units, a heat pump does both. By collecting the heat in the air and pushing it in and out of your home, it can regulate the temperature during any season.

During the winter, your heat pump pulls in the air from your home. It forces the cold air outside and releases the warmer air back into the house. In summer, it reverses the process. The hot air is forced outside, and the cold air is pumped back into the house.

Advantages of Heat Pumps

There are several advantages (and disadvantages) to installing a heat pump in your home. Here are the pros.

  • You can accomplish both your heating and cooling with one unit.
  • Heat pumps deliver double the energy that they consume, thus saving you money.
  • If you have asthma or allergies, a heat pump may help reduce your symptoms because it pumps out cleaner air than other HVAC systems.
  • Your house will have a more balanced temperature because heat pumps offer better air circulation.
  • If you need to sell your home, your heat pump installation may net you a higher appraisal value, giving you greater long-term value.

Disadvantages of Heat Pumps

Now let’s take a look at a few of the cons associated with heat pumps.

  • Heat pumps are less efficient in colder areas and you may need to install a backup heat source, such as a small gas furnace.
  • When temperatures drop below freezing, then a heat pump has to work pretty hard to separate the cold air from warmer air. Over time, this can shorten its life.
  • A heat pump costs more to install than a separate heating and cooling system. However, you should ask your supplier for information about tax credits and rebates.
  • Heat pumps don’t heat air like a furnace. Therefore the ambient temperature might feel less warm. Some people don’t care for the more moderate temperatures.
  • Heat pumps need regular maintenance throughout the year, and repairs need to be done by a trained technician who understands heat pumps and how they work. This generally means higher maintenance costs.

All systems have their advantages and disadvantages. However, despite a few minor drawbacks, heat pumps are the best for energy conservation. If you need to lower your heating bills, then consider a heat pump. They represent a long-term investment that can save you money over time and increase the value of your home.

For more information, contact your Rheem Pro Partner in Colorado or Wyoming today and find out if a heat pump is right for your home and needs.