3 Furnace Noises You Shouldn’t Ignore

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3 Furnace Noises You Shouldn't Ignore

Most of us are accustomed to the sounds our furnaces make. We barely notice the hum of the blower running or the little pops from the air ducts. These are normal, but what about the noises that get our attention because they aren’t what we’re used to hearing? Sounds that are suddenly loud or increasingly loud over time, or have a different quality than the typical sounds could be a signal that it is time to call a professional for a repair or maintenance. Don’t ignore them. Delaying service could result in loss of service, more expensive repairs or premature replacement.

Here are three furnace noises you should never ignore:

1. Loud scraping sound

A scraping, metal-on-metal sound is likely a problem with the blower wheel. One possibility is that the wheel has come loose and is scraping against the blower casing. If caught early, before there is much damage, your HVAC professional can tighten the wheel. This is a relatively easy and inexpensive fix. Another possibility is that the blower wheel is broken and needs to be replaced. Lastly, the most serious cause would be that the motor mount has broken and the entire blower assembly has dropped so that it is hitting the housing.

2. Loud bang or pop when furnace turns on

Dirt on the furnace burners could cause a delay in ignition. When this happens, excess gas builds up and once it does ignite there is a small explosion. Eventually, these explosions can crack the heat exchanger, which is very expensive to replace and usually results in replacing the entire furnace. If you hear this sound, have a professional check it out right away. Regular maintenance, however, will prevent this from happening.
Another cause of this type of noise could be expanding and contracting metal ductwork. This occurs when the air ducts are not the correct size or are too flimsy, if vents are closed or if the air filter is clogged.

3. Squealing or whining noise

A high-pitched squealing noise is not as serious as the first two noises, but should be checked out by a professional to keep it from turning into a bigger problem. This type of sound may indicate a loose or damaged blower belt that should be adjusted or replaced by a technician. It could also by caused by a shaft bearing that needs lubrication; a technician can apply a lightweight oil where needed. Or, it could mean the blower motor is malfunctioning and needs to be repaired or replaced.

Don’t let furnace noises keep you up at night! Contact a Rheem Pro Partner today in Colorado or Wyoming, to schedule your annual maintenance check, and sleep peacefully all winter long.

What’s the Difference Between a Single Stage, 2-Stage & Variable Speed Furnace?

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What's the Difference Between a Single Stage, 2-Stage & Variable Speed Furnace?

Choosing the right furnace for your home begins with evaluating several factors including heating requirements, existing ductwork and insulation, the size of your home and the number of levels, and, of course, your budget. Armed with that information, your HVAC professional can help you determine which type will best meet your needs: single stage furnace, 2-stage furnace or variable speed furnace.

Here is an overview of these three types:

1. Single-Stage Furnace

The single-stage furnace, also called a one-stage furnace, operates with only two settings: “on” or “off.” When it is on, it is at the maximum level of heat output, with no adjustment for how warm or cold it is outside or within different areas of your home. Because this type of furnace is always on “high,” it lags in energy efficiency behind the other options.

2. Two-Stage Furnace

The two-stage furnace is a step up in efficiency from the single-stage furnace, with two stages that allow for some adjustment for changes in temperature. Most (about 75%) of the time, this type of furnace operates in the first stage which is approximately 65-75% of the furnace’s capacity, saving on energy. When the temperature drops and more heat is needed, the second stage engages to meet the current heating requirements for as long as necessary. Once the temperature warms up again, operation returns to normal, so you are only paying for the additional energy when you need it. Because of the lower output most of the time, the furnace does run longer, but this also allows for more even heat distribution.Two-stage furnaces have quieter operation, are more efficient and are better for the environment.

3. Variable Speed Furnace

The variable speed furnace offers the most flexibility in terms of operation and energy use. Instead of stages, this furnace relies on a fan motor operating at different speeds to adjust the amount of heat output produced. Increased airflow results in greater comfort, because temperature is more consistent throughout the home, and better air quality because more air goes through the filter. Even when the furnace is not heating, air can continue to circulate, which actually reduces the need for it to turn on as often. This results in energy savings and lower utility bills. An added bonus: the variable speed furnace is quieter than the single-stage or two-stage furnaces.

Rheem manufactures all three types of furnace.

Find the new furnace that is best for your Colorado or Wyoming home. Contact a Rheem Pro Partner today!